dangolding:

The last few weeks in videogame culture have seen a level of combativeness more marked and bitter than any beforehand.

First, a developer—a woman who makes games who has had so much piled on to her that I don’t want to perpetuate things by naming her—was the target of a harassment campaign that…

A must-read. 

19
July

Gameranx is Hiring (A Personality for YouTube)

Greetings! Gameranx is looking to hire someone to establish its presence on YouTube. We’re looking for someone with a passion for video games, and the ability to produce quality video content with consistency. 

We want someone with a willingness to appear on camera in presenting breaking gaming news and also lists. Because everyone loves lists!  We want someone who can provide good commentary. 

Are you who we’re looking for? Then read on. 

Requirements: 

You have to be 18 or older. 

You have the decent—not necessarily professional—recording equipment (like a clear microphone and a camera that isn’t a potato) 

You must have some video samples. We’d like to see your work.  

What’s asked of you:
2 lists per week, 5 news videos per week (think daily news) 

Notes:

minor update: To clarify, we’re looking for a video personality—a host, rather than a video journalist. We’ll be providing the news and details so you don’t have to do much (if any) original research when working on the stories. 

You don’t have to have existing popularity on YouTube. 

We’ve got a budget of $500 a month. This may increase as we acquire more views and the channel increases in popularity. This job is open to everyone worldwide. 

If you’re up for the job, contact me at ian@gameranx.com. 

10
July

on anxiety and blogging more often

It’s been awhile since I ‘blogged’ about anything. I write on a daily basis, but what I write is news. Boring, sometimes not so boring news about video games and video game related things on Gameranx. I rarely, if ever, write anything that isn’t gaming news related. Doing so—writing about non-gaming news—feels somewhat different. It’s difficult to write about something that’s not the gaming news because of how long I’ve been doing just the news and nothing else. It’s like I’m oiling rarely used gears.

It’s bad enough that I don’t write about gaming-related things at a length, even when I have a lot of things to say about a subject. It’s always in little bits and snippets—250 words or less.

I’m trying to change that. I’m trying to make it a habit—call it a resolution, because that’s what it is—of writing more often about subjects that aren’t the gaming news.

What spurred all of this? Boredom, mostly. (I should add that ‘boredom’ for me comes from feeling an undercurrent of anxiety—it’s difficult for me to commit to things and I often find myself in a pit of ennui) And dreams. I get dreams where I write long articles—sometimes they’re blog posts, and sometimes they’re editorials. I know how incredibly stupid this must all sound, especially to anyone who writes often and always. I worry that I’ll come across as a shallow writer with nothing to say when I write things like this, so I mostly don’t.

I’m battling no small amount of anxiety even as I write this. That’s something I struggle with—anxiety. I don’t know why I do. I just do. I even take medication for it these days, but it’s hard to do anything different when it comes to attempting to overcome anxiety, especially when you’re so used to giving in and losing against it.

Anyway I’d like to write more often about anything and everything and make it a habit of doing so. Whether it keeps my brain active or whether it’ll make it easier for me to pitch articles to major publications matters not. What matters is that I write often and find it easy to write. That’s what I want out of this.

The biggest fear I have right now is that I won’t write anything tomorrow and this blog post will look like any number of laughable (yes, they are) blog posts by writers claiming to revive their stagnant blogs. How hilarious would that be?

(Source: wei723, via pearwaldorf)

(via drug-st0re)

18
December

PAX and The Inexplicable Diversity Lounge

image

Video games have a bigotry problem, at least in the community where they are celebrated.

As if missing the point entirely, Penny Arcade is attempting to address the issue of bigotry in games through the inexplicable creation of the “Diversity Lounge” across its Penny Arcade Expos.

The “Roll for Diversity Hub and Lounge” at PAX events in Seattle, Boston and Melbourne will be “a resource for PAX attendees to find information related to issues surrounding women, LGBTQ, people of color, disabled people and mental health issues in gaming.”

In effect, the Diversity Lounge is supposed to act as a safe space, in a larger, unsafe environment. At first glance, it might sound like a good idea, except it isn’t. That larger, unsafe environment—PAX—ought to be a safe space to begin with.

The Diversity Lounge serves only to segregate diverse gamers from their non-diverse (read: heterosexual white men) counterparts and fails to address the fact that diversity itself isn’t the problem, but bigotry.

Indeed, the Diversity Lounge idea wouldn’t be a bad one were it not for the fact that Penny Arcade does not have a wider no-tolerance-to-bigotry policy where women and those of diverse backgrounds can feel safe. I’m told that they have those in colleges, but colleges in general have policies to keep their students safe regardless of their racial and gender orientation. PAX has no such policy, especially considering it’s a place where Mike Krahulik, one half of Penny Arcade, said it was a mistake to apologize for rape jokes, to an audience that even cheered him on.

So here’s a question to PAX’s organizers: Why not make all of PAX a safe and inclusive space?

Favourites fan arts: Bioshock Infinite, part I/?.

Credits (1,2,3,4,5,6).

(via shy-town)

skyrim locationsblackreach

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(via yermeowjesty)

hoarr:

I think the only thing happening today is laundry and playing through this beautiful HD remake of The Legend of Zelda: Wind Waker.

(via celestialskys)